He’s behind you! The real enemy of promise…

Sums it all up beautifully.

Love Learning....

Nothing lets the government off the hook for social disadvantage and poverty quite like the teaching profession blaming each other for the academic underachievement of disadvantaged pupils. While people stand on either side of the prog/trad debate shouting at each other for the perceived failure or torture of the innocents, the government can relax, knowing that everyone is too distracted to turn the fire on them for the fact that there are now 4 million children living in poverty.

Poverty, we know, creates stress. In the UK, the 6th richest nation on earth, 400,000 children don’t have a bed of their own. At least 120,000 of them are homeless and living in temporary accommodation. Even those with beds and homes live with uncertainty. A cross party group of MPs in April, led by Frank Field, found that as many as 3,000,000 children were going hungry in the school holidays and…

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Stop moaning about tests!

Ramblings of a Teacher

Today marked the end of 4 short days of testing. For Year 6 pupils everywhere, they’ll have spent less than 5 hours on tests – probably not for the first time this year – and later in the year we’ll find out how they did.

Now, I’m the first to complain when assessment isn’t working, and there are lots of problems with KS2 assessment. Statutory Teacher Assessment is a joke; the stakes for schools – and especially headteachers – are ridiculously high; the grammar test is unnecessary for accountability and unnecessarily prescriptive. I certainly couldn’t be seen as an apologist for the DfE. And yet…

For some reason it appears that many primary teachers (particularly in Facebook groups, it seems) are cross that some of the tests contained hard questions. I’ve genuinely seen someone complain that their low-ability children can’t reach the expected standard. Surely that’s the very reason they’re defining them…

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Sats Hell

The Diary of a Not So Ordinary Boy

Next week will be first time in a while that I haven’t been involved with end of key stage two assessments in a professional capacity. I don’t miss it, I’ll be frank. I don’t miss creeping through the school, shushing younger children, or sitting with the anxious ones, reading questions and watching them squirm in their seats and yet still plump for the wrong answer.

I don’t miss hour after hour of practice papers. (And hour after hour of subsequent marking.) I don’t miss sending home homework involving page after page of sums in those shiny brown revision books (also to be marked). I don’t miss spelling tests and mental maths tests, explaining how it will be on a CD just the same so get used to the funny voice and no, there will be no second chances, no opportunities to go back over a question you missed.

I suppose…

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As the Cracks Grow Wider

@LeadingLearner

Over the years I’ve done a fair bit of decorating; a tub of polyfilla, bit of sanding and you’re ready to paper over the cracks.  However, when it comes to structural damage and a huge crack up the wall you can’t paper over it and pretend it’s not there.  I sense we are hitting the educational equivalent; the cracks are too big to continue papering over. 

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