The role of teacher should be privileged over any leadership role.

chronotope

One of the dominant narratives in contemporary education is the ubiquitous assertion that everyone is now a leader. Not only are all teachers now leaders, but even the kids are leaders whether they like it or not. Within such a climate we might want to ask; if everyone is now a leader, then what distinguishes the role of leader from any other, and who now leads the leaders? The other serious question is what does this say about teachers who just want to remain in the classroom?

Of course, on an abstract theoretical level all classroom teachers are leaders in the sense that they ‘lead’ a class of young people, but in reality they are not ‘leaders’ in the same way that effective senior leaders or heads of departments are. They aren’t making difficult decisions on a need-to-know basis about confidential pupil welfare issues, they are not organising whole school timetables and assemblies, they are…

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Choosing Knowledge

Summer Turner

Like many fellow Twitter users, I’ve become fairly bored with the knowledge vs. skills debate; not because I think it’s a false dichotomy or not worthy of discussion but because I want to move the debate forward. There are now a number of people, schools and institutions for whom the knowledge vs. skills debate has been answered and the answer is: knowledge for the win. So what next?

I’m of the opinion that, even amongst the knowledge community, there is no shared clear definition of ‘knowledge’ and teaching a ‘knowledge-led/knowledge-rich curriculum’. Perhaps we can determine that there doesn’t need to be one way to view this but we should be having the debates and discussions which unpick what is being meant when we talk about knowledge. This is as important for those wanting to continue the knowledge vs skills debate as it is for those who wish to embrace a…

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